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Wednesday, April 13, 2016

An innovative approach to coffee production in the Sidama region is helping smallholder farmers improve their livelihoods while setting an example of environmental sustainability.

An innovative approach to coffee production in the Sidama region is helping smallholder farmers improve their livelihoods while setting an example of environmental sustainability.

April is Earth Month, an opportunity to honor our planet and affirm environmental commitments. Given TechnoServe’s work with smallholder farmers, who are particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of climate change and environmental degradation, we are continually reminded of the importance of sustainable farming.

During harvest period, I didn’t even want to wash my school uniform in the river because it smelled like rotten coffee pulp, and I didn’t want to be ashamed at school.

IKITE THOMAS

Throughout Ethiopia's Sidama region, thousands of farmers rely on coffee farming as their primary source of income. Because of this, the region has the highest concentration of wet mills in Africa, but many of these mills were built with older technology, which can send large amounts of wastewater and decaying coffee pulp into the local water supply. In 2012 TechnoServe and Mother Parkers Tea & Coffee launched the Water Wise Coffee initiative in the Sidama region of Ethiopia, which helps these wet mills implement a low-cost, sustainable solution to wastewater management.

For Ikite Thomas, who lives in the coffee-farming village of Sheicha, pollution from the wet mills was affecting her studies. The 16-year-old was often tasked with fetching water in the morning for her family, and during harvest season this meant she had to wake up very early to get to the river before the wet mills started running and polluting the water. Often this chore made the ambitous and diligent student – who hopes to become a doctor – late for class. 

“During harvest period, I didn’t even want to wash my school uniform in the river because it smelled like rotten coffee pulp, and I didn’t want to be ashamed at school,” she said.

Once Water Wise began to work with the local wet mills, Ikite noticed that the river ran clean again, even when the mills were processing coffee. She no longer had to make the early morning trips to fetch water for her family, allowing her to arrive to school on time and alert. “More than anything I am happy that I don’t have to come early in the morning during harvest season – and no longer be late for school,” she said.

Water Wise has helped 49 wet mills in the region implement the sustainable solution. Together with our supporters, we can help convert even more wet mills, enhancing the water quality for families, like Ikite's, who depend on the river, and promoting a sustainable coffee industry.

- See more at: http://www.technoserve.org/bSee more at: http://www.technoserve.org/blog/transforming-harvest-season-in-sidama#sthash.5iApTnHY.dpuf

Nine companies bought the tender documents but none show up on the D-day

The Ethiopian Industrial Parks Development Corporation (IPDC) has decided to announce the bid again, after the Monday, April 04, 2016 the blow at the tender opening where none of the offerers appeared. The IPDC tendered a bid for the Hawassa Industrial Park factory sheds only for local investors but failed after nine companies bought the detailed documents of the tender and never issued an offer.

"This is our pilot project following the policy direction adopted encourage local industrialists" Arkebe Oukubay (Phd) , told Fortune. "Since this is the first trial, we have learnt a lot and adopt a mechanism to ensure participation of locals"

He also said that an immediate bid would be announced by the end of this week.

Owner of one pioneering garment manufacturing plant told Fortune that the bid invitation came as a surprise.

"The time given was so short that we could not meet the deadline," the investor said. "It takes a whole new assessment study to go into the new venture, even if you are in the sector for so long."

The 21 days time lapse given between the bid announcement and the deadline is too short many agreed.

The Corporation explains the situation in a different dimension.

"It is to keep the momentum that we are processing entrance in parallel with construction," Shiferaw Solomon, deputy CEO of Operation & IP management said. "No time shall be wasted for preparation if they can finish while construction is finalized."

Source:http://allafrica.com/stories/201604131242.html

Hawassa becomes the 20th domestic destination for Ethiopian Airlines, which has announced that it will begin flights four weekly flights there from April 16, 2016. 

Ethiopian’s Q-400 aircraft will make the 40 minute flight every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. 

The Airline has pledged to offer international standard services for domestic travellers at the lowest possible cost. This will not only boost the region’s growing investment and tourism industry but will enhance the socio-economic relations of the state with others. Domestic and international travellers will be able to easily make flight transfers to and from Hawassa. 

The city is the capital of the Southern Nations Nationalities and Peoples State and is one of the best tourist destinations in Ethiopia. Its attractions include one of the seven lakes of the Great Rift Valley as well as its diverse cultures and languages. 

Hawassa’s 457 million Br Airport is yet to be inaugurate, and is said to be officially in the same week  that Ethiopian makes its maiden flight to that destination. 

Opening this route is part of the Airline’s Vision 2025 which includes the establishment of Ethiopian Express as a strategic business unit for the delivery of essential air connectivity. The new service is expected to attract the business community, public sector personnel, university students and lecturers as well as tourists.